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iStick

Objective: To design and develop user centered, sensors based alerting blind stick for easy navigation of visually challenged on the roads. Contributor(s): Vijayakumar Pattanashetti, Roshan Lal D., Chandan Kumar, Soundarya, Nithin Gowda, Vinayak N. Team name: Team Nexus Date: We are team of six enthusiast second year Electronics and Communication Engineering students. As a part of our course, Design Thinking 2 under the guidance of Prof. Vaibhav B., we carried out this project successfully. We practiced design thinking methodologies before and while coming up with the product, where we kept our target customers i.e., visually challenged at the center of product design. Interests: Internet of Things (IoT), Signal Processing, Machine Learning, Python, Embedded Systems, Quantum Computing, Deep Learning and Image Processing, Autonomous Vehicles. Past Projects : We have been part of projects in other teams and as individuals. Here are a few projects that some of us have been part of. Virtual Body Guard - an app built using Python that safe guards the women in metro cities. It triggers when women requests foe help by speaking "Help me". Once triggered, it starts capturing the location, random photos, videos, sometimes nearby device information and sends to the emergency contact via…

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TransMod

Objective: To develop a module that makes any car a self driving car. Contributor(s): Arun Kumar Mohanty, Jivitesh Debata, Md. Azmal, Kamakshya Mohapatra, Anshuman Pandia, Manosini Das Team name: MultiWe Date: We are a team of six people who have worked in different sectors of engineering. We are curious to learn about any viable tech. We believe in developing skills. Interests: Machine learning, Artificial intelligence, Computer vision, Additive and subtractive Manufacturing, Drone development, Web development Past Projects : Wireless communication Drone development Block chain development Web development Object Detection Interest areas for collaboration and learning: 3D printing, CNC machining, Machine learning, Artificial intelligence, Drone development

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Send data from NodeMCU to Raspberry Pi using MQTT

Apr 22,20by li2admin

Objectives Set up NodeMCU to communicate to an MQTT server Set up an MQTT server on Raspberry Pi Send data from NodeMCU to Raspberry Pi Things NodeMCU Breadboard Raspberry Pi Micro USB cable Let’s begin! MQTT is a communication protocol used to communicate between connected devices. Devices can publish data and several other devices can subscribe to the data published by other devices. In our case, the NodeMCU will publish data and the Raspberry Pi will be subscribed to the NodeMCU’s data. Note: If for any reason, you do not have Arduino IDE or NodeMCU installed on your Arduino IDE, follow the steps in this unit. Setting up the NodeMCU for MQTT Communication Install PubSubClient by Nick O’Leary on the Arduino IDE Step 1: Navigate to Sketch->Include library->Manage libraries… Step 2: Search for PubSubClient Step 3: Install the library PubSubClient by Nick O’Leary   Interfacing NodeMCU with IR sensor (analog)   View the code on Gist. Setting up Raspberry Pi for MQTT Communication We will install paho MQTT to use in Python and Mosquitto to use from the terminal. Update everything by typing following command, sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install build-essential python-dev python-openssl Now let’s install a package called Mosquitto…

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Headless Setup of Raspberry Pi

Apr 22,20by li2admin

Objectives Enabling the server configuration of Raspberry Pi Connect to Raspberry Pi via Secure Shell (SSH) Connect to Raspberry Pi via PuTTY Access Raspberry Pi from a remote computer Things For this project we will be needing the following components and software Raspberry Pi 3B (quantity: 1 no.) microSD card (quantity: 1 no.) 5V power adapter and Micro USB cable A to B (quantity: 1 no.) WiFi router / mobile hotspot (quantity: 1 no.) Raspibian Stretch SD Card Formatter software and BalenaEtcher software Wireless Network Watcher. VNC Viewer software PuTTY. Let’s Begin! The Raspberry Pi is a series of small single-board computers developed in the United Kingdom by the Raspberry Pi Foundation to promote teaching of basic computer science in schools and in developing countries. It does not include peripherals (such as keyboards and mice) and cases. However, some accessories have been included in several official and unofficial bundles. Now let us get started with setting up the Raspberry Pi. SD Card Formatter In the following units we prefer using the Raspbian OS as it is more flexible and preferred OS for the Raspberry Pi (RPi). To install the Raspbian OS on the sd card make sure the sd card is formatted as it already has the NOOBs OS installer in…

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Interface buzzer module with NodeMCU

Apr 22,20by li2admin

Objectives Interface a buzzer module with NodeMCU Things NodeMCU board (quantity: 1 no.) Micro USB cable A to B (quantity: 1 no.) Breadboard (quantity: 1 no.) Buzzer module (quantity: 1 no.) Jumper wire – male to male (quantity: 3 no.) Arduino IDE on your computer Let’s begin! A buzzer is an audio signaling device. Buzzers can be categorized into active and passive ones. The difference between an active buzzer and a passive buzzer is: An active buzzer has a built-in oscillating source, so it will make sounds when electrified. But a passive buzzer does not have such source, so it will not tweet if DC signals are used; instead, you need to use square waves whose frequency is between 2K and 5K to drive it. The active buzzer is often more expensive than the passive one because of multiple built-in oscillating circuits.   Interfacing buzzer module with NodeMCU   Final Code View the code on Gist. To copy the code, right click on view raw at the bottom of the code, click on open link in new tab and then copy the code. There you go! Takeaway

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Interface LDR sensor module and RGB LED module with NodeMCU

Apr 22,20by li2admin

Objectives Interface LDR sensor module and RGB LED module with NodeMCU Things NodeMCU board (quantity: 1 no.) Micro USB cable A to B (quantity: 1 no.) Breadboard (quantity: 1 no.) Common Cathode RGB LED module (quantity: 1 no.) LDR sensor module (quantity: 1 no.) Jumper wire – male to male (quantity: 7 no.) Jumper wire – male to female (quantity: 2 no.) Arduino IDE on your computer Let’s begin!   Interfacing LDR sensor module and RGB LED module with NodeMCU   Final Code View the code on Gist. To copy the code, right click on view raw at the bottom of the code, click on open link in new tab and then copy the code. There you go! Takeaway

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